Dry Saunas Tips

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What are the benefits of a dry sauna?

Dry Sauna Benefits

There are many benefits to a sauna experience, either a wet sauna or a dry sauna. You will sweat in both types of saunas, though you may not sweat as much in a wet sauna. Sweating detoxifies your body, ridding it of artificial toxins and other harmful chemicals.

The main benefits of dry saunas, however, differ somewhat from a wet sauna. With a dry sauna, your heart rate and your metabolism will increase because of the extreme temperatures. Because of these two effects, you can burn up to 300 calories in 20 minutes in a dry sauna – the equivalent of going for a short run or long walk. Because of the intense calorie-burning, the dry sauna has more weight loss benefits than a wet sauna.

   
What are alternatives to traditional dry saunas?

Dry Sauna Alternatives

Dry saunas work in much the same way as wet saunas, but without the use of steam. Traditional dry saunas use wood, electric, or gas stoves that heat rocks, thereby heating the air as well.

If you want to use a dry sauna, but don't want to set up a traditional dry sauna heater and rocks, you can use infrared heat to heat your sauna. Infrared heat is a dry heat that mimics the sun's radiant heat without the UV rays that can burn your skin.

An infrared sauna is a completely dry heat, making the end sauna experience similar to that of a traditional dry sauna. You can install infrared heaters in a dedicated sauna room, and have the same ambiance as a traditional sauna, but radiant heat is often easier to install and heats at a much lower heat than other dry saunas – making it cheaper to use.

   
What is a dry sauna?

Definition Of A Dry Sauna

When people think of “saunas,” they usually think of steamy rooms where bathers lounge on wooden benches, enjoying the heat and humidity. But there is such a thing as a dry sauna, though the name “dry sauna” can be somewhat misleading.

Traditional Finnish saunas use steam to make the bather sweat, whereas dry saunas, or traditional Swedish saunas, don't use steam – they just use heat.

Dry saunas must use temperatures that are much higher than steam saunas, because humid air transfers heat more effectively than dry air; this is why it feels hotter outside on a humid day than on a dry day. Even though the temperature is higher, however, it does not mean that a dry sauna is more uncomfortable than a steam sauna.

   
What are portable dry saunas, and what are their advantages?

Portable Dry Saunas

If you would like to invest in a dry sauna but don't want to dedicate the space to building one in your house or on your property, consider a portable dry sauna.

Portable dry saunas allow you to enjoy the benefits of a dry sauna (such as detoxification and muscle relaxation) without having to go to the expense or labor of building a whole sauna room in your home. Portable dry saunas can be very cost effective, as well; some are available for only a fraction of the cost of a traditional sauna room. Some portable dry saunas, however, are top of the line, and cost just as much as a sauna room; their advantage is they take up less space and can be more easily moved than a traditional sauna.

The types of portable dry saunas range from tent-like saunas that you sit in and zip to your chin, to saunas that resemble tanning beds. The tanning-bed style of portable dry saunas often add massage technology and music to the heat that circulates around the body, giving the user a full-body relaxation experience.

   
What is the difference between a dry sauna and an infrared sauna?

Traditional Dry Saunas Vs. Infrared Saunas

There are several different kinds of saunas available, including wet saunas, dry saunas, and infrared saunas. Although infrared saunas employ “dry” heat to warm the body and give the user the benefits of a sauna, there is actually more differences between dry saunas and infrared saunas than there are between wet saunas and dry saunas.

A dry sauna uses the same kind of heater as a wet sauna does, such as a wood burning sauna heater from Catalina Luxury Saunas or an electric sauna heater from MrSauna. You just don't pour water over the rocks to produce steam if you want a dry sauna experience.

An infrared sauna, on the other hand, like the infrared sauna rooms from SaunaGen or Polar Sauna, uses an entirely different kind of heat to warm the body. Rather than using a central stove for heat, infrared saunas use radiant heat, similar to the sun's heat but without the UV rays. Infrared saunas will not produce steam. Because infrared saunas use radiant heat, the temperature in an infrared sauna is also much lower than the temperature in a dry sauna.

   
What is the protocol when using a dry sauna?

Protocol When Using a Dry Sauna

If you want to get the maximum sauna experience when using a dry sauna, you should sauna like the Swedes do. Here are the steps you should take to sauna like a Swede, and ensure your Swedish sauna is the most beneficial and pleasant experience:

• Remove all your clothes before entering the sauna
• Shower first to make sure the sauna stays clean
• Take a small towel into the sauna with you to sit on
• Sit on the upper bench (if there is one), as that's the preferred seat
• Put water on the bench to keep your rear end from burning
• Just relax during the first few minutes of your sauna, which allows the dry heat to open your pores and fill your body
• Afterwards, take another shower if you want to cool down
• Some people like to go back and forth between the shower and the sauna, to get the full benefit of the sauna heat
• Don't put your clothes back on until you are completely cool

   
How do dry saunas work?

Dry Saunas and How They Work

Dry saunas work in much the same way as wet saunas, but they don't use steam like wet saunas do.

In dry saunas, a stove, such as the SWA model from Avalon or the Laatu LMR sauna heater from the Catalina Series by Sauna Warehouse, is used to heat the air in the sauna. Whereas in a wet sauna, water is poured on the heater's rocks to produce steam, in a dry sauna, little or no water is used and the air is heated only by the stove and the rocks.

Temperatures in a dry sauna can approach 200 degrees Fahrenheit, but because it is a “dry heat,” the temperature is tolerable to the bathers. Make sure the stove you select for your dry sauna will produce the high temperatures necessary; talk to an expert at saunas.com for help on selecting a heater.

   
What are the differences between wet saunas and dry saunas?

The Difference Between Wet Saunas And Dry Saunas

Although a wet sauna sounds like a steam room, whereas a dry sauna sounds like a room with blazing heat, the two types of saunas are actually very similar.

Both types of saunas use some sort of heater (gas, electric, or wood) with volcanic stones. However, in a wet sauna, water is poured over the rocks to produce steam, whereas in a dry sauna, no water is added – and no steam is generated.

One major difference between a wet sauna and a dry sauna is the temperature necessary in both types of saunas. Because humid air more effectively transmits heat, the temperature in a wet sauna is lower than the temperature in a dry sauna. Dry sauna temperatures can approach 200 degrees Fahrenheit; because the heat is so dry, however, the bather's sweat evaporates quickly and the heat is tolerable.

   
How do dry saunas work?

How Dry Saunas Work

Dry saunas work in much the same way as wet saunas, but with one major difference: they don't use steam.

In dry saunas, a stove (just as with a wet sauna) is used to heat the air in the sauna. The stove can be electric, gas, or wood, and usually has rocks on it that heat up as well. Whereas in a wet sauna, water is poured on the rocks to produce steam, in a dry sauna, little or no water is used and the air is heated only by the stove and the rocks.

Temperatures in a dry sauna can approach 200 degrees Fahrenheit, but because it is a “dry heat,” the temperature is tolerable to the bathers. Just like a hot day in the American Southwest (with temperatures up to 114 degrees, but with no humidity) feels cooler than a hot day in the American South (with temperatures only around 85 or 90 degrees, with 20-30% humidity), a dry sauna can actually feel cooler than a wet sauna even though it has a higher temperature.

   
How do you go about building a dry sauna?

How to Build a Dry Sauna

If you want to build your own dry sauna, you have several different options. You can design and build your dry sauna yourself or you can buy a pre-cut or pre-built sauna kit from a manufacturer like Arvo Saunas or Catalina Luxury Saunas and simply follow the directions to put together the sauna.

Regardless of if you are going to build a sauna yourself or buy a kit, make sure you decide how large to make the sauna, where you want it, and what kind of power source you want to use for your stove. Talk to a saunas.com expert about design considerations for your dry sauna, and what option –pre-built or building your own – is right for you.

If you want to purchase a manufacturer's sauna kit, like a pre-cut sauna kit from Avalon, you need to give saunas.com your measurements and the manufacturer will build the sauna to fit your specifications. Many sauna kits like the one from Avalon come with accessories, like wall lights and thermometers, and have optional upgrades, such as wall controls for the heater and windows.

   
What are the differences between wet saunas and dry saunas?

Wet Saunas vs. Dry Saunas

Although a wet sauna sounds like a steam room, whereas a dry sauna sounds like a room with blazing heat, the two types of saunas are actually very similar.

Both types of saunas use a heater (gas, electric, or wood) with volcanic stones, from manufacturers such as Avalon, Catalina Luxury Saunas, Tylo, and MrSauna. However, in a wet sauna, water is poured over the rocks to produce steam, whereas in a dry sauna, no water is added – and no steam is generated.

One major difference between a wet sauna and a dry sauna is the temperature necessary in both types of saunas to produce a beneficial experience. Humid air more effectively transmits heat, so the temperature in a wet sauna is lower than the temperature in a dry sauna. Dry sauna temperatures can approach 200 degrees Fahrenheit; because the heat is so dry, however, the bather's sweat evaporates quickly. Browse saunas.com to get an idea about which kind of heater would be right for your dry sauna.

   
What are the benefits of a dry sauna?

The Benefits Of Dry Sauna

There are many benefits to a sauna experience, be it a wet sauna or a dry sauna. Even though it doesn't sound like it, you will sweat in a dry sauna, though not as much as in a wet sauna. Sweating in saunas is a good way to detoxify your body, ridding it of artificial toxins and other harmful chemicals.

The main benefits of dry saunas, however, differ somewhat from a wet sauna. With a dry sauna, your heart rate will increase, because of the extreme heat, and your metabolism will increase. Because of these two effects, you can burn up to 300 calories in 20 minutes in a dry sauna – the equivalent of going for a short run or long walk. Because of the intense calorie-burning, the dry sauna has more weight loss benefits than a wet sauna.

   
Which should you choose – a wet sauna or a dry sauna?

Deciding If A Dry Sauna Is Right For You

Because there are differences between dry saunas and wet saunas, you may be wondering which one is best for you to put into your home or use.

Most sauna experts say that the choice between a dry sauna experience and a wet sauna experience is merely a matter of preference. Dry saunas usually operate at a higher temperature than wet saunas, but don't employ humidity to heat the air. Since dry saunas use a “dry heat,” they can feel cooler than a wet sauna; if you have sensitivity to heat, a dry sauna may be more comfortable.

Dry heat can also aggravate respiratory conditions in some people, more than humidity. The extreme temperatures in a dry sauna can cause your mucus membranes to dry out and be somewhat uncomfortable, so if you have a sensitive respiratory system, consider wet saunas instead.

Dry saunas boost metabolism and heart rate more than wet saunas, so they can aid more in weight loss than wet saunas do; wet saunas, on the other hand, will cause the bather to sweat more.

The bottom line to deciding which sauna is right for you is that it is a completely personal decision. Both wet saunas and dry saunas provide their own benefits and will result in a relaxing, positive experience.

   
What is the protocol when using a dry sauna?

Dry Sauna Etiquette, From The Swedes

If you want to get the maximum sauna experience when using a dry sauna, you should sauna like the Swedes do, as they developed the dry sauna. Here are the steps you should take to sauna like a Swede:

• Remove all your clothes before entering the sauna
• Shower first to make sure the sauna stays clean
• Take a small towel into the sauna with you to sit on
• Sit on the upper bench (if there is one), as that's the preferred seat
• Put water on the bench to keep you from burning
• Take another shower if you want to cool down after your sauna
• Go back and forth between the shower and the sauna, to get the full benefit of the sauna heat
• Don't put your clothes back on until you are completely cool

There are several options for dry saunas available at saunas.com; you can select a standard sauna heater by a manufacturer like Polar Sauna or MrSauna and use it without water, or you can select an infrared sauna room from SaunaGen or the Caatu Series by Sauna Warehouse.

   
What are alternatives to traditional dry saunas?

Infrared Sauna: A Dry Sauna Alternative

Dry saunas work in much the same way as wet saunas, but without the use of steam. Traditional dry saunas use wood, electric, or gas stoves that heat rocks, like heaters from MrSauna or Catalina Luxury Saunas, thereby heating the air as well.

If you want to use a dry sauna, but don't want to set up a traditional dry sauna heater and rocks, you can use infrared heat to heat your sauna. Infrared heat is a dry heat that mimics the sun's radiant heat without the UV rays that can burn your skin.

An infrared sauna is a completely dry heat, making the end sauna experience similar to that of a traditional dry sauna. Saunas.com carries several brands of infrared saunas, such as SaunaGen Infrared Sauna Rooms, Laatu Infrared Sauna Rooms from the Catalina Series by Sauna Warehouse, and Polar Infrared Sauna Rooms by Polar Sauna.

   
What are portable dry saunas, and what are their advantages?

Portable Dry Saunas

If you would like to invest in a dry sauna but don't want to dedicate the space to building one in your house or on your property, consider a portable dry sauna like the Polar Portable or Polar Knockdown Portable Sauna from Polar Sauna.

Portable dry saunas allow you to enjoy the benefits of a dry sauna (such as detoxification and muscle relaxation) without having to go to the expense or labor of building a whole dedicated sauna room in your home. They are usually easy to install, and some can even be moved. For example, the Polar Portable Two-Piece Sauna Room sets up in minutes and can come with casters for easy moving.

Both models of portable sauna from Polar Sauna will give the full sauna experience, as they're made from cedar wood and have space for reclining and relaxing in the sauna. They are good alternatives to dedicated sauna rooms and will provide all the same benefits that permanent saunas do.

   
What is the difference between a dry sauna and an infrared sauna?

The Difference Between Dry Saunas And Infrared Saunas

There are several different kinds of saunas, including wet saunas, dry saunas, and infrared saunas. Although infrared saunas employ “dry” heat to warm the body and give the user the benefits of a sauna, there is actually a larger difference between dry saunas and infrared saunas than there is between wet saunas and dry saunas.

A dry sauna uses the same kind of heater as a wet sauna does, which usually involves some sort of stove and rocks heated over the stove. In a wet sauna, water is poured over the rocks to create steam, whereas in a dry sauna, no water is used and there is therefore no steam. A dry sauna has the capability of producing steam, just as a wet sauna does.

An infrared sauna, on the other hand, uses an entirely different kind of heat to warm the body. Rather than using a central stove for heat, infrared saunas use radiant heat, similar to the sun's heat but without the UV rays. It will not produce steam; no matter what, it is a “dry” heat. The temperature in an infrared sauna is also much lower than the temperature in a dry sauna, as infrared heat needs a lower temperature to warm the body than does traditional stove heat.

   
What is the history of the dry sauna?

History Of The Dry Sauna

Saunas originated in Finland some 2000 years ago, where the weather was cold and damp. The Finns used saunas to warm up, and to also rejuvenate the mind and body. The traditional Finnish sauna uses steam to heat the body and make the sauna bathers sweat.

Swedes modified the Finnish sauna by changing to use “dry heat” instead of steam heat, originating the dry sauna. The Swedish saunas were usually heated in the same way as the Finnish saunas, with hot stoves and heated rocks, but where the Finns would pour water on the rocks to generate steam, the Swedes wouldn't, resulting in “dry heat.”

As the popularity of saunas has spread around the world, people now have the option of picking steam saunas or dry saunas to relax in. They can either sauna like the Finns do, with steam and vapor, or like the Swedes do, with a higher, dry heat.

   
What is a dry sauna?

What Are Dry Saunas?

When people think of “saunas,” they usually think of steamy rooms where bathers lounge on wooden benches, enjoying the heat and humidity. But there is such a thing as a dry sauna, though the name “dry sauna” can be somewhat misleading. Traditional Finnish saunas use steam to make the bather sweat, whereas dry saunas, or traditional Swedish saunas, don't use steam, just heat. Bathers will still sweat in a Swedish sauna, just not as much.

Sauna heaters from manufacturers such as Avalon and PolarSauna, available through saunas.com, can be used as either steam sauna heaters or dry sauna heaters; to use them as dry sauna heaters, you would just refrain from pouring water over the rocks.

Dry saunas must use temperatures that are much higher than steam saunas, because humid air transfers heat more effectively than dry air; this is why it feels hotter outside on a humid day than on a dry day. The higher temperature, however, does not make for a more uncomfortable sauna experience. If you have questions about dry saunas versus steam saunas, talk to an expert at saunas.com

   
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